How to Get Customers to Submit Testimonials

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One of the most effective methods of demonstrating trustworthiness on your ecommerce site is to include testimonials from satisfied customers. People trust other people. When those “other people” have good things to say, first-timers are reassured and the value of this simply cannot be overstated. So, here’s how to get customers to submit testimonials.

Don’t Ask for Testimonials

 Yes, we know the title of this article is “How to Get Customers to Submit Testimonials.” However, the moment you ask for one, you’ll pervert the process. If you really want truth, ask for feedback rather than a testimonial. When you ask for the former, people feel freer to express their true thoughts. When you ask for the latter, respondents feel a need to come up with something nice to say and it often comes across as contrived.

Here’s What to Ask

Still though, you have to ask some key survey questions to get the information you need. Let’s say you’re selling ebooks. Put yourself in the position of a person coming to your ebook site for the first time. Ask yourself what they’d need to know to shop confidently. Then, ask your current customers those very questions.

  1. What were your primary concerns about buying your new XYZ ebook here?
  1. What ultimately made you decide to make the purchase here?
  1. Now that you have it, what did you like most about buying your XYZ ebook here?
  1. How has the XYZ ebook lived up to your expectations?
  1. Would you recommend others buy ebooks at this site? Why, or why not?
  1. What can we do to make the shopping experience more pleasant?
  1. Is there anything you’d like to say that we didn’t ask?
  1. May we have permission to share this feedback with visitors to the site?

What to Do with The Responses 

Read between the lines and you’ll see each question was designed specifically to uncover objections potential customers might have about buying their ebooks at your site. First-time visitors are going to be concerned about your trustworthiness, which is exactly why question number one gets to the heart of that matter. In a similar fashion, each additional question touches upon some other concern a new customer might have about doing business with you. Once you have all of the responses, you can weave them together to form testimonials capable of putting newbies to your site at ease.

The result will look something like this: “When I considered buying ebooks here, I was concerned about the quality of the books and the nature of the service I’d get if something went wrong. After reading about so many positive experiences, I decided to give it a shot. Now that I have the book I am…”

Always Keep It 100…

Your respondents will see their words on your site. Do not spin their responses. Don’t make them say what you want them to say; let them say what you need them to say. If you twist the meaning of their words, everyone on social media is going to know you can’t be trusted. Which, basically, is the exact opposite of what you were trying to accomplish in the first place.

If the feedback is negative, you’ll know exactly what you need to do. Correct the situation, then wait a few months and ask another group of customers for their thoughts. In so doing, you’ll get an honest critique of your site, even as you get customers to submit testimonials.

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How to Get Customers to Submit Testimonials

Image1

One of the most effective methods of demonstrating trustworthiness on your ecommerce site is to include testimonials from satisfied customers. People trust other people. When those “other people” have good things to say, first-timers are reassured and the value of this simply cannot be overstated. So, here’s how to get customers to submit testimonials.

Don’t Ask for Testimonials

 Yes, we know the title of this article is “How to Get Customers to Submit Testimonials.” However, the moment you ask for one, you’ll pervert the process. If you really want truth, ask for feedback rather than a testimonial. When you ask for the former, people feel freer to express their true thoughts. When you ask for the latter, respondents feel a need to come up with something nice to say and it often comes across as contrived.

Here’s What to Ask

Still though, you have to ask some key survey questions to get the information you need. Let’s say you’re selling ebooks. Put yourself in the position of a person coming to your ebook site for the first time. Ask yourself what they’d need to know to shop confidently. Then, ask your current customers those very questions.

  1. What were your primary concerns about buying your new XYZ ebook here?
  1. What ultimately made you decide to make the purchase here?
  1. Now that you have it, what did you like most about buying your XYZ ebook here?
  1. How has the XYZ ebook lived up to your expectations?
  1. Would you recommend others buy ebooks at this site? Why, or why not?
  1. What can we do to make the shopping experience more pleasant?
  1. Is there anything you’d like to say that we didn’t ask?
  1. May we have permission to share this feedback with visitors to the site?

What to Do with The Responses 

Read between the lines and you’ll see each question was designed specifically to uncover objections potential customers might have about buying their ebooks at your site. First-time visitors are going to be concerned about your trustworthiness, which is exactly why question number one gets to the heart of that matter. In a similar fashion, each additional question touches upon some other concern a new customer might have about doing business with you. Once you have all of the responses, you can weave them together to form testimonials capable of putting newbies to your site at ease.

The result will look something like this: “When I considered buying ebooks here, I was concerned about the quality of the books and the nature of the service I’d get if something went wrong. After reading about so many positive experiences, I decided to give it a shot. Now that I have the book I am…”

Always Keep It 100…

Your respondents will see their words on your site. Do not spin their responses. Don’t make them say what you want them to say; let them say what you need them to say. If you twist the meaning of their words, everyone on social media is going to know you can’t be trusted. Which, basically, is the exact opposite of what you were trying to accomplish in the first place.

If the feedback is negative, you’ll know exactly what you need to do. Correct the situation, then wait a few months and ask another group of customers for their thoughts. In so doing, you’ll get an honest critique of your site, even as you get customers to submit testimonials.

Enjoy Plunged in Debt?

Pid

Subscribe to get our latest content by email.

Powered by ConvertKit

Speak Your Mind

*