Ok, I'm Joining

I work well with a goal in mind. I’ve done the research and it just makes sense to join the Yakezie Challenge. I have a LONG way to go but since I will be on Mat leave for exactly 6 more months why not make the most of my free time (as little as it may be).

This challenge is just another fantastic example of how amazing PF bloggers are. Like I said in yesterdays post, if you’ve never blogged in another area (PF being you’re only experience)  you are spoiled, PF bloggers really are a ‘community’ of individuals.

Wish me luck!

My Friend Won The Lottery

If you saw my tweet last night you’d already know that one of my classmates (not one of these girls) won the lottery last week. Like, 25-million-dollars-won-the-lottery.

Do you think if she remembers today is my birthday she’ll send a paper present?

She happens to be one of the sweetest, most giving people I know and am sure that she and her husband-to-be (they’re getting married in 2 weeks, together for 14 years) will spend/invest/give the money wisely but this hits so close to home. I can’t help but dream about what I would do with that kind of money and how my life would change. Remember…we don’t pay taxes on lottery winnings in Canada so she gets all 25 million.  I could buy Greece! I kid. Oh man the things I could do though…

I’m finding it hard to not let it get the best of me but I can’t stop thinking about it. Hubby and I don’t even ‘play’ the lottery, outside of a scratch ticket in a stocking or odd pro-line, so it’s not like it could happen to us, but I still find myself daydreaming.

I’m literally sitting here looking for creative ways to come up with enough money for our power bill while she is financially set for the rest of her life and many generations behind her, should she chose.

I don’t like the way I feel when I let these thoughts consume me so I’m trying not to think about it too hard but when things like Facebook exist it’s rather difficult. I guess I’m thankful for a baby who consumes most all of my time to act as a distraction!

Have you ever known someone that close to win the lottery? What did they do with the money?

PS- All you Americans, VOTE today!

Photo Source

Money That Would Have Changed My Life.

My great-grandfather was many things, pilot in World War II, immigrant from England, devout member of Canada’s Anglican church but he was also key player in Canada’s education system as it stands today.

Education was so important in my family and my great-grandfather was a huge force behind this. My grandmother followed in his teaching footsteps, not common for a woman born in the ’30’s to teach while raising a family with a husband who also works full-time. After she gave birth to her third child she eventually stayed home since her husband, a civil engineer, loved to be on the job site and so they were constantly moving around (my mom moved 13 times before her 18th birthday) making it difficult for my grandmother to maintain a teaching position.

When my great-grandfather passed he left some money to my sister and I for our future education. My mom being a single mother didn’t want to have to think about it so she gave it to her parents to hold onto until we needed it. It wasn’t much, maybe $2,000 but it was something. When my grandparents died (within three years of eachother) that money then became a part of their estate since it was in their savings accounts.

My grandparents, unknowingly to my mother, had also set aside enough money for all the current-born grandchildren to pursue post secondary education. I was to receive about $25,000 when they died. Enough for most of my undergraduate degree.

Without getting into too many messy family affairs here, I’ve never seen the money. My grandmother died in 1998.

In the turmoil of death of a parent, my mom was convinced to sign over being the executor of the will to her brother who lived in the province where they died. He convinced her that it would be easier for someone in province to deal with the legal stuff rather than her having to travel until it was settled. Long story short he took the entire contents of the estate and spent every. last. penny. {Just so I don’t have to answer what I can predict may be a million questions, yes, there were legal repercussion for this but regardless, my family never saw any of the money}

I know life is too short to hold grudges, but I fully believe that this money would have changed my life and I can’t help but think about it from time-to-time.

If I had that money I could have saved enough money during my undergrad to pay for my post-degree diploma, potentially graduating debt free….

If I had that money I wouldn’t have been in a position to charge thousands of dollars worth of tuition on credit cards….

If I had that money I may now be in a situation where our only debts would be hubby’s small student loan, car and mortgage…

If I had that money I may be able to afford to stay at home longer, if not permanently with kiddo….

If I had that money my life would undoubtedly be so different.

I know there’s no way of knowing which paths life may have created for me should I have received that money, but I sure would like to think that I’d be in a much better situation then I am now. It doesn’t help that I see my uncle and his family ”living the dream life” through photos almost everyday. They live in a beautiful gated community in the US, travelling home to Canada as often as they want. Their three kids will never have to worry about financial struggles yet we suffer because of his actions.

I’m human, I’ve thought about pursing legal action myself as an adult, I’ve even looked into getting answers through sites like LegalZoom, but I’ve decided to let bygones be bygones and just let it go.

Have you ever been in a (monetary) situation that could have potentially changed your life’s path?

Please note that ‘m not trying to make excuses for the financial path I went down. There is SO much more to my life story as the reasoning behind each decision that will probably take years to unfold on this blog, if ever. Let’s just say that unfortunately the money I made wasn’t given the opportunity to be used for school as much as I would have liked.

How Selling Lemonade Changed How I View Money

I think most people have some ”a-ha” moment about money while in their transition from childhood/student life to adulthood. For me it was a story I read in Reader’s Digest last year (although I have no idea how old the copy was). We have copious amounts of copies of Readers Digest in our waiting room at work. I don’t often read them but when patients don’t show up or cancel last-minute sometimes there isn’t much else to do.

I am very much paraphrasing the ideas of the article and will probably not get all the details right, so I apologise in advance, the main point of the story remains intact though.

It was a story about a young boy, who at a young age (something like 6 years old), decided he wanted to make some of his own money while his parents hosted a yard sale one summer morning. With the ”initial investment” from his parents of about $5.00, he set up a lemonade stand selling glasses at 0.50/cup. He ended up making something like $20.00 that day alone. He explains that he re-paid his parents and put his $15.00 profit in his piggy bank.

Over the next few summers he continued selling lemonade at every opportunity, always saving his profits. It wasn’t until he was something like 9 years old that he told his dad that he wanted to get out of the ‘lemonade business’ and buy a lawnmower. His parents had no idea that in the past few summers their son had made, and saved, hundreds of dollars selling lemonade. Enough to buy a nice self-propelled gas lawnmower which will help him on his next entrepreneurial endeavor.

Let me explain how smart and business savvy this child was. He took his lemonade profits, bought the lawn mower but had no intention of wasting his childhood away mowing lawns, instead he would hire someone older, stronger, and more experienced to do the work for him all while making a profit himself.

He reached out to some older kids he knew and offered them a summer job mowing lawns. He would provide the lawnmower, gas and nail down a few regular clients in the neighborhood (ensuring job security) but the older boy would do the work. He charged $25.00-$40.00/lawn depending on size and paid the older boy $15.00-$25.00/each lawn. Between the regular clients and the occasional cuts for people who were on vacation etc, they young boy profited something like $3000 for basically doing nothing (other than being the mastermind behind the operation) and the older boy made even more. Win-win situation. He was 9 years old!

He did this for the next few summers and eventually bought a few lawnmowers, hiring someone to man it each time, and carved out quite a name for himself in the lawn care industry in his community.

I don’t remember the story-ending details, and I don’t want to make something up, but I feel like this kid went on to university (totally paid for between his savings and scholarships to a business school). At the time the article was written, he was something like 20 years old and on his way to being a millionaire by the time he was in his late 30’s due to smart investments.

I was flabbergasted when I read this story about the sheer intelligence and savvy mind of this kid. How does a young 6-year-old even think about such a business model? Most kids are playing with toys and concerned about what their friends are doing for the summer, not how to start-up and maintain a business.

And this is how selling lemonade changed how I view my money and forced me to look at what I’ve accomplished financially in my 28 years on this earth (which, sadly is basically nothing).

Has a story every changed how you view money? What do you think about this story?

_________________________________________________________________________

Lemonade Photo Source

Lawnmower Photo Source

ps_menu_class_0

Ok, I'm Joining

I work well with a goal in mind. I’ve done the research and it just makes sense to join the Yakezie Challenge. I have a LONG way to go but since I will be on Mat leave for exactly 6 more months why not make the most of my free time (as little as it may be).

This challenge is just another fantastic example of how amazing PF bloggers are. Like I said in yesterdays post, if you’ve never blogged in another area (PF being you’re only experience)  you are spoiled, PF bloggers really are a ‘community’ of individuals.

Wish me luck!

My Friend Won The Lottery

If you saw my tweet last night you’d already know that one of my classmates (not one of these girls) won the lottery last week. Like, 25-million-dollars-won-the-lottery.

Do you think if she remembers today is my birthday she’ll send a paper present?

She happens to be one of the sweetest, most giving people I know and am sure that she and her husband-to-be (they’re getting married in 2 weeks, together for 14 years) will spend/invest/give the money wisely but this hits so close to home. I can’t help but dream about what I would do with that kind of money and how my life would change. Remember…we don’t pay taxes on lottery winnings in Canada so she gets all 25 million.  I could buy Greece! I kid. Oh man the things I could do though…

I’m finding it hard to not let it get the best of me but I can’t stop thinking about it. Hubby and I don’t even ‘play’ the lottery, outside of a scratch ticket in a stocking or odd pro-line, so it’s not like it could happen to us, but I still find myself daydreaming.

I’m literally sitting here looking for creative ways to come up with enough money for our power bill while she is financially set for the rest of her life and many generations behind her, should she chose.

I don’t like the way I feel when I let these thoughts consume me so I’m trying not to think about it too hard but when things like Facebook exist it’s rather difficult. I guess I’m thankful for a baby who consumes most all of my time to act as a distraction!

Have you ever known someone that close to win the lottery? What did they do with the money?

PS- All you Americans, VOTE today!

Photo Source

Money That Would Have Changed My Life.

My great-grandfather was many things, pilot in World War II, immigrant from England, devout member of Canada’s Anglican church but he was also key player in Canada’s education system as it stands today.

Education was so important in my family and my great-grandfather was a huge force behind this. My grandmother followed in his teaching footsteps, not common for a woman born in the ’30’s to teach while raising a family with a husband who also works full-time. After she gave birth to her third child she eventually stayed home since her husband, a civil engineer, loved to be on the job site and so they were constantly moving around (my mom moved 13 times before her 18th birthday) making it difficult for my grandmother to maintain a teaching position.

When my great-grandfather passed he left some money to my sister and I for our future education. My mom being a single mother didn’t want to have to think about it so she gave it to her parents to hold onto until we needed it. It wasn’t much, maybe $2,000 but it was something. When my grandparents died (within three years of eachother) that money then became a part of their estate since it was in their savings accounts.

My grandparents, unknowingly to my mother, had also set aside enough money for all the current-born grandchildren to pursue post secondary education. I was to receive about $25,000 when they died. Enough for most of my undergraduate degree.

Without getting into too many messy family affairs here, I’ve never seen the money. My grandmother died in 1998.

In the turmoil of death of a parent, my mom was convinced to sign over being the executor of the will to her brother who lived in the province where they died. He convinced her that it would be easier for someone in province to deal with the legal stuff rather than her having to travel until it was settled. Long story short he took the entire contents of the estate and spent every. last. penny. {Just so I don’t have to answer what I can predict may be a million questions, yes, there were legal repercussion for this but regardless, my family never saw any of the money}

I know life is too short to hold grudges, but I fully believe that this money would have changed my life and I can’t help but think about it from time-to-time.

If I had that money I could have saved enough money during my undergrad to pay for my post-degree diploma, potentially graduating debt free….

If I had that money I wouldn’t have been in a position to charge thousands of dollars worth of tuition on credit cards….

If I had that money I may now be in a situation where our only debts would be hubby’s small student loan, car and mortgage…

If I had that money I may be able to afford to stay at home longer, if not permanently with kiddo….

If I had that money my life would undoubtedly be so different.

I know there’s no way of knowing which paths life may have created for me should I have received that money, but I sure would like to think that I’d be in a much better situation then I am now. It doesn’t help that I see my uncle and his family ”living the dream life” through photos almost everyday. They live in a beautiful gated community in the US, travelling home to Canada as often as they want. Their three kids will never have to worry about financial struggles yet we suffer because of his actions.

I’m human, I’ve thought about pursing legal action myself as an adult, I’ve even looked into getting answers through sites like LegalZoom, but I’ve decided to let bygones be bygones and just let it go.

Have you ever been in a (monetary) situation that could have potentially changed your life’s path?

Please note that ‘m not trying to make excuses for the financial path I went down. There is SO much more to my life story as the reasoning behind each decision that will probably take years to unfold on this blog, if ever. Let’s just say that unfortunately the money I made wasn’t given the opportunity to be used for school as much as I would have liked.

How Selling Lemonade Changed How I View Money

I think most people have some ”a-ha” moment about money while in their transition from childhood/student life to adulthood. For me it was a story I read in Reader’s Digest last year (although I have no idea how old the copy was). We have copious amounts of copies of Readers Digest in our waiting room at work. I don’t often read them but when patients don’t show up or cancel last-minute sometimes there isn’t much else to do.

I am very much paraphrasing the ideas of the article and will probably not get all the details right, so I apologise in advance, the main point of the story remains intact though.

It was a story about a young boy, who at a young age (something like 6 years old), decided he wanted to make some of his own money while his parents hosted a yard sale one summer morning. With the ”initial investment” from his parents of about $5.00, he set up a lemonade stand selling glasses at 0.50/cup. He ended up making something like $20.00 that day alone. He explains that he re-paid his parents and put his $15.00 profit in his piggy bank.

Over the next few summers he continued selling lemonade at every opportunity, always saving his profits. It wasn’t until he was something like 9 years old that he told his dad that he wanted to get out of the ‘lemonade business’ and buy a lawnmower. His parents had no idea that in the past few summers their son had made, and saved, hundreds of dollars selling lemonade. Enough to buy a nice self-propelled gas lawnmower which will help him on his next entrepreneurial endeavor.

Let me explain how smart and business savvy this child was. He took his lemonade profits, bought the lawn mower but had no intention of wasting his childhood away mowing lawns, instead he would hire someone older, stronger, and more experienced to do the work for him all while making a profit himself.

He reached out to some older kids he knew and offered them a summer job mowing lawns. He would provide the lawnmower, gas and nail down a few regular clients in the neighborhood (ensuring job security) but the older boy would do the work. He charged $25.00-$40.00/lawn depending on size and paid the older boy $15.00-$25.00/each lawn. Between the regular clients and the occasional cuts for people who were on vacation etc, they young boy profited something like $3000 for basically doing nothing (other than being the mastermind behind the operation) and the older boy made even more. Win-win situation. He was 9 years old!

He did this for the next few summers and eventually bought a few lawnmowers, hiring someone to man it each time, and carved out quite a name for himself in the lawn care industry in his community.

I don’t remember the story-ending details, and I don’t want to make something up, but I feel like this kid went on to university (totally paid for between his savings and scholarships to a business school). At the time the article was written, he was something like 20 years old and on his way to being a millionaire by the time he was in his late 30’s due to smart investments.

I was flabbergasted when I read this story about the sheer intelligence and savvy mind of this kid. How does a young 6-year-old even think about such a business model? Most kids are playing with toys and concerned about what their friends are doing for the summer, not how to start-up and maintain a business.

And this is how selling lemonade changed how I view my money and forced me to look at what I’ve accomplished financially in my 28 years on this earth (which, sadly is basically nothing).

Has a story every changed how you view money? What do you think about this story?

_________________________________________________________________________

Lemonade Photo Source

Lawnmower Photo Source