Is The Personal Finance Community Too Judgmental?

wpid-20140713_232643.jpgWhen one opens their lives up on the internet be it though engaging in social media, blogging  or uploading cute pictures of your kids on Instagram, like it or not, you are willingly opening your lives up to outside criticism. This is especially true of blogging and a huge reason why it requires a bit of thick skin. You are, without a doubt, going to get backlash from casual readers to fellow bloggers. Creating a variance in conversation is what I love about blogging though so I welcome it, life would be pretty boring if people agreed with everything I said and did. We grow as people through exploration and accepting changes.

Last week I published a post titled ”How much is too much for groceries”. If you read my blog regularly, or even know me personally, you know I was by no means trying to ”bash” anyone or have a ”holier than thou” attitude. I was, in all honesty, looking to do what bloggers do best, create conversation. As someone who only spends about $500 per month on food, $800+ seemed like a lot to me, I didn’t say it was as lot for everyone nor was I trying to imply you’re a bad person if you spend more than what I spend on food every month, I genuinely wanted to know how far off the mark I was with my readers for average money spent per month, that’s it.

When comments started coming in, with quite a few new people popping up (thank you for stopping by), I was a little surprised at the interpretation of my post and other people’s comments. There was more than one comment stating in various words that the personal finance community was in general too judgmental (of non-PFers I imagine) and one person even said they limit their engagement within the community because of said judgement. While I thank you for your comment I feel like I need to defend the online community I am apart of, again please feel free to disagree.

While there is an extreme variance in what you will find within this community, everything from the extreme savers, early retirees, people in debt, millionaires, struggling students and everything in between, my experience is that people who blog and engage in this community do so to learn. We learn through interactions, posts, comments, arguments, reading, getting opinions, you name it. Though there has been many posts I disagree with I never felt that post was written in a judgmental tone, I simply have a difference of opinion, difference in experience or all together may think it is outright wrong. That doesn’t mean they are judging me for being different.

Had I written the post and finished with ” You’re all idiots and suck as humans if your family of six can’t or isn’t willing to eat on $400 per month” then yeah, that’s a judgmental and bitchy thing to do but for the most part the personal finance community offers opinions and questions to be challenged. My mission with the post in question was accomplished. People clearly pointed out how easily their family sustains themselves on $200-250 per week for a multitude of reasons and for that I thank you for offering me insight, even if I likely will never be in your position, I thank you for enlightening me, it was all I wanted.

I’ve said this before but I didn’t know personal finance was a ”thing”. I started this blog blindly and am so thankful for the internet niche I have stumbled into. Thank you for your comments, your encouragement, your disagreements and your lack of judgement when I’ve put myself out there. Maybe I’m alone but no, if we’re generalizing, the personal finance community is not judgement unless you include the personal challenges it may provoke, for that there is no apology.

Enjoy Plunged in Debt?

Pid

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Comments

  1. I couldn’t agree more. When I write about my finances, I weigh things and “consider” a lot of edits to make look it neutral and genuine. I put it in the way that my readers would really relate and get inspirations. I am not only writing to inform but also to educate them.
    Jayson @ Monster Piggy Bank recently posted..Is it OK to make money from others fear?My Profile

  2. Totally agree with you on the learning aspect of PF and blogging. Personal finance is a topic I love and I enjoy reading what others think and do, even if it differs from my own approach. Like you, I don’t consider the community to be judgmental–I really do get the sense that everyone wants to help each out. And sometimes, that involves pointing out potential pitfalls/differences of opinion. Thanks for this!
    Mrs. Frugalwoods recently posted..Music Mondays: What’s Your Mushaboom?My Profile

  3. I don’t think the personal finance blogging community is judgemental at all. I’m a fairly new blogger and I feel that everyone has welcomed me with open arms. The support and help I’ve received has been awesome. I’m sorry that your post was misinterpreted.
    Brandy recently posted..A Review: 101 Ways to Earn Money from HomeMy Profile

  4. I think that personal finance bloggers are just as varied as any other community and there are certainly some who seem more judgmental than others; however, it’s just a matter of finding the voices you related to. For me, I find most of them supportive and encouraging, but those are the people I choose to follow. I don’t think that anyone should avoid the space all together because then they would miss out on all of the wonderful people who are committed to educating, supporting and learning along their personal journeys.
    Shannon @ Financially Blonde recently posted..Music Mondays – MushaboomMy Profile

  5. All of social media is pretty much the same. When you right a post or start a thread you need to follow it up with an explanation because someone didn’t understand or missed the point. It’s because of the lack of reading emotion and intention into someone’s post. The majority of people never get it on the first try and some are way to sensitive to bother with. The thread then becomes a long explanation of what was intended and the respondents usually add in their own opinion of some other unrelated points they try to make. This is especially true of FB pages. If someone is totally off grasping the meaning I would just ignore them. There’s no need to comment on their comments. I tend to ignore them, all!

  6. The personal finance blogging community is most certainly judgemental, but as humans, we all are judgemental (even if we don’t state our judgements of everything).

    Bloggers in a niche generally are the exception to a rule, and most bloggers aren’t writing for other bloggers. So while there may be strong opinions and a lot of judgement coming from other bloggers (because they have it together enough in the topic to write about it themselves), 95% of blog readers won’t comment, so we see a small sample size of mainly bloggers commenting on other blogger’s posts, instead of the real audience/readership.

    What I’m pretty much trying to say is that we only see the judgemental comments, so it seems as if all people who are interested in personal finance are judgemental, but it’s really just a very small portion of people who act this way but they just so happen to be in the upfront and center of it all.
    Sarah recently posted..The End of AnonymityMy Profile

  7. I do think personal finance bloggers can get pretty judgemental. There are certain topics that really seem to bring out the worst.
    1. Buying a new car instead of used.
    2. Buying things instead of traveling
    3. Spending too much on groceries (wink, wink)
    4. Eating out
    5. Spending money on cable TV

    There really seems to be a sense of them knowing the best way to live and aren’t shy about telling someone when they aren’t living in the approved way.

  8. I think it was perhaps more of the comments that were left with people chiming in that their grocery budget was WAYYY too high. According to who? Who is to say what’s to high & what’s not? I wouldn’t worry about it… i’ve gotten a slew of comments about certains items i’ve purchased MANY times times… lol! Onwards & upwards! 😉
    Carla recently posted..Sunday Night Chit-Chat…My Profile

  9. I think the personal finance community can sometimes be judgmental. One topic I hardly ever talk about on my blog is cars because of the angry comments I sometimes get. So, I just try to entirely avoid the subject.
    Michelle recently posted..Why You Should Invest and Save For Retirement – Plus a Personal Finance Confession FailMy Profile

  10. I haven’t run across a judgmental PF blogger, but their commenters… holy cow. I don’t get quite as many testy commenters on my blog. I guess money talk makes people feisty.
    I’m in the US (Chicago) and I spend $50 a month on groceries for 1. With once a week eating out and limited alcohol, I’d say the total budget is $100-$150. I mentioned that on another PF blog in the comments and definitely got pounced on!
    Stephanie recently posted..10 Best // Life LatelyMy Profile

  11. I think many people fall into the trap of ‘This has worked great for me so it has to work for you’ and fail to realize that there might be other ways for other people. This might come across as being overly judgmental. I don’t think you’re in this at all but I have seen others like this, and I tend to gravitate away from those sites.
    Money Beagle recently posted..Starting An Emergency Fund Gives You The Most Bang For Your BuckMy Profile

  12. Judgemental? Moi? Well, maybe a little 🙂

    I think pounding home the “Get out of debt!” message is important, however, I don’t think I’d fault anyone who felt that reusable feminine hygiene products were a little too frugal for them. How you want to live is really up to you, just don’t get into debt doing it.
    Alan W. recently posted..Reversing Mutual Fund PurchasesMy Profile

  13. Interesting… I usually find that people are not critical enough, giving lots of props to people making awful decisions. Outside of the PF bubble, especially on sites like Yahoo Finance, though, the trolls come out in droves! As a blog owner, you have the power to delete comments 😉
    Anne @ Money Propeller recently posted..Never Lock Yourself Out Again With This Easy SolutionMy Profile

  14. Boy I hope I’ve never come across as judgmental, if I have no one has pointed it out yet. Honestly, the thought never crossed my mind. I started blogging to find accountability and to help me learn and pay off debt. I also thought that if I could inspire someone else to get started with paying off debt and decluttering too then that’d be an added bonus. I did not think you came across judgmental at all. Keep up the hard work!
    Kayla @ Shoeaholicnomore recently posted..Shopping Ban PlanMy Profile

  15. I have found it to be just the opposite. I read a lot of finance blogs, and it feels like people hold back from criticism. Someone is deep in debt and living on a hobby farm with horses? Well, that’s just fine. The country is great for the kids. You want to take that vacation even though you have a boatload of student debt? Well, life is about balance, you know. I find that if you offer any honest, constructive and yes, non-judgmental criticism, people just jump all over you!

    I agree with Ann@Money Propeller. People often can’t take honest criticism, even in the kindest tone. And then they jump all over the commentator and everyone chimes in.

  16. It sounds like people were being a judge to you! You do open your life to criticism and that just comes with the territory. I didn’t read the article but I am sure you did not come off as judge or anything like that. Everyone is free to do as they please at the end of the day and what works for one, may not work for another.
    Debt and the Girl recently posted..One of My Reasons for Working Hard…My Profile

  17. Part of the problem is, we PF bloggers read and comment on each other’s blogs all the time. We interact through social media, and even connect on other social media platforms. We become friends….friends speak to each other more freely, which can come across as a bit crass or judgmental to your average joe reader who doesn’t have the same connection, or realize that it exists.
    Travis @debtchronicles recently posted..Motivational Monday: Mistakes Pave The Way To A Greater SuccessMy Profile

  18. I’m new to the blogging scene and I’ve been trying to find the line here.
    Emily @ Simple Cheap Mom recently posted..Engaged without a Ring: The Tale of our Engagement CatMy Profile

  19. I saw the post title in my feed before I could read the article and my answer was an immediate and resounding YES!
    After reading the article, I think my own answer needs some clarification. I don’t think the PF community necessarily posts negative comments on others’ blogs, and wouldn’t normally admonish you for your personal choices, but I do think that sometimes just the posts that are written by PF bloggers are very judgmental in nature. It almost seems like if you spend any money on anything that is non-essential, then you’re doing it wrong. The attention-grabbing headlines and the meant-for-shock-value posts cause serious eyerolls and I simply choose to ignore those bloggers.
    Newlyweds on a Budget recently posted..Why We Got Started with a Certified Financial PlannerMy Profile

  20. Sometimes I think people are pretty soft. I have found most people to be really too supportive, but I think if you are asking for comments, you should expect opinion. I remember working as a TV reporter when we all discussed the idea of adding comments to our news articles. Of course we were hoping for clicks, interaction and more revenue. We also said we were opening ourselves up to the best and most likely the worst of the internet. I am pretty used to it having had my articles attacked for years while working in news. I recently had a few articles featured on major websites and now my work has been exposed to 10’s of thousands of people instead of a few hundred. People are overly confident and critical in anonymity. That is the internet and social media…you have to have a thick skin. But now I am intrigued to write about cars and groceries 🙂
    Lance @ HWI recently posted..I Could Learn About Finances But Cats Are Too FunnyMy Profile

  21. I read your post on groceries and didn’t find it judgmental and was surprised that some commenters felt it was. I was amazed the people that could manage to keep their grocery low as this is something we struggle with. I took it as motivation to try harder, do more meal planning etc.

    On the other hand, depending on how one handles ones own finances and goals, it is unlikely that we will agree with all PF all of the time. I can think of 2 – 3 I’ve read recently and thought, I wouldn’t have done that, and I’m sure others would say the same for me. Sometimes you point out an alternative view (especially if it’s before a decision is made) and sometimes you just say nothing because you realize their goals or tolerances are different from yours, or in the spirit of community, it’s water under the bridge. But on the other hand, we shouldn’t put our $hit out there if we’re not ready to receive feedback, solicited or not. Posting a blog post means you’re soliciting feedback. I wrote a post on this recently based on my experiences posting comments to another blogger’s post.
    debt debs recently posted..55 Reasons it’s Okay To Be 55My Profile

  22. I don’t find that you’re ever judgmental in your posts. PF is just that, personal, and therefore not everyone will agree on everything. It’s fun to read and see what others do and to learn from the community of bloggers that are out there.
    J recently posted..Wedding Wednesday – Alternative Guest BooksMy Profile

  23. Of course we’re judgmental-we’re human! However, I think that how we express that judgement is the key. People aren’t always going to do what WE think is the right thing. There will be people who spend money on stuff that WE think is wrong. Etc. Until I start paying someone else’s mortgage I don’t feel it necessary to bash their choices-even if I think they are stupid choices. I make choices that other people will think are stupid.

    At the end of the day we have to do what’s right for us in our personal situation. If it’s the wrong decision we’ll learn pretty quickly. As for individuals who leave angry comments (I read the ones in that specific post) maybe they were spending too much and felt called out on it? But, until I start buying their groceries it’s really not my issue. Boom.
    Michelle recently posted..Food Waste, the Documentary DIVE, and How YOU Consume, Let’s Save Some MoneyMy Profile

  24. There are 2 points I would like to make here.

    1. The blogging community is not judgmental at all.
    2. Remember that opinion you had that was different than mine? You are a stupid jerk for thinking that.

    Thanks.
    Andy@artofbeingcheap recently posted..The cheap alternative to a memory foam mattressMy Profile

  25. I think that the majority of the community is here to help. I’ve had a lot of interaction with others and have nothing but good things to say about them. However, there are a few bad apples out there. I think they just try to pick a fight because that is who they are.

    A long time ago I got flack from another blogger for promoting a credit card. His claim was I was just writing a review because I was getting a cut. When I looked on his site, he was doing the same thing. At first I engaged him, but quickly realized there was no solution in his mind. He just kept attacking. So I ignored him and eventually he gave up.

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Is The Personal Finance Community Too Judgmental?

wpid-20140713_232643.jpgWhen one opens their lives up on the internet be it though engaging in social media, blogging  or uploading cute pictures of your kids on Instagram, like it or not, you are willingly opening your lives up to outside criticism. This is especially true of blogging and a huge reason why it requires a bit of thick skin. You are, without a doubt, going to get backlash from casual readers to fellow bloggers. Creating a variance in conversation is what I love about blogging though so I welcome it, life would be pretty boring if people agreed with everything I said and did. We grow as people through exploration and accepting changes.

Last week I published a post titled ”How much is too much for groceries”. If you read my blog regularly, or even know me personally, you know I was by no means trying to ”bash” anyone or have a ”holier than thou” attitude. I was, in all honesty, looking to do what bloggers do best, create conversation. As someone who only spends about $500 per month on food, $800+ seemed like a lot to me, I didn’t say it was as lot for everyone nor was I trying to imply you’re a bad person if you spend more than what I spend on food every month, I genuinely wanted to know how far off the mark I was with my readers for average money spent per month, that’s it.

When comments started coming in, with quite a few new people popping up (thank you for stopping by), I was a little surprised at the interpretation of my post and other people’s comments. There was more than one comment stating in various words that the personal finance community was in general too judgmental (of non-PFers I imagine) and one person even said they limit their engagement within the community because of said judgement. While I thank you for your comment I feel like I need to defend the online community I am apart of, again please feel free to disagree.

While there is an extreme variance in what you will find within this community, everything from the extreme savers, early retirees, people in debt, millionaires, struggling students and everything in between, my experience is that people who blog and engage in this community do so to learn. We learn through interactions, posts, comments, arguments, reading, getting opinions, you name it. Though there has been many posts I disagree with I never felt that post was written in a judgmental tone, I simply have a difference of opinion, difference in experience or all together may think it is outright wrong. That doesn’t mean they are judging me for being different.

Had I written the post and finished with ” You’re all idiots and suck as humans if your family of six can’t or isn’t willing to eat on $400 per month” then yeah, that’s a judgmental and bitchy thing to do but for the most part the personal finance community offers opinions and questions to be challenged. My mission with the post in question was accomplished. People clearly pointed out how easily their family sustains themselves on $200-250 per week for a multitude of reasons and for that I thank you for offering me insight, even if I likely will never be in your position, I thank you for enlightening me, it was all I wanted.

I’ve said this before but I didn’t know personal finance was a ”thing”. I started this blog blindly and am so thankful for the internet niche I have stumbled into. Thank you for your comments, your encouragement, your disagreements and your lack of judgement when I’ve put myself out there. Maybe I’m alone but no, if we’re generalizing, the personal finance community is not judgement unless you include the personal challenges it may provoke, for that there is no apology.

Enjoy Plunged in Debt?

Pid

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  1. I couldn’t agree more. When I write about my finances, I weigh things and “consider” a lot of edits to make look it neutral and genuine. I put it in the way that my readers would really relate and get inspirations. I am not only writing to inform but also to educate them.

  2. Totally agree with you on the learning aspect of PF and blogging. Personal finance is a topic I love and I enjoy reading what others think and do, even if it differs from my own approach. Like you, I don’t consider the community to be judgmental–I really do get the sense that everyone wants to help each out. And sometimes, that involves pointing out potential pitfalls/differences of opinion. Thanks for this!

  3. Brandy says:

    I don’t think the personal finance blogging community is judgemental at all. I’m a fairly new blogger and I feel that everyone has welcomed me with open arms. The support and help I’ve received has been awesome. I’m sorry that your post was misinterpreted.

  4. I think that personal finance bloggers are just as varied as any other community and there are certainly some who seem more judgmental than others; however, it’s just a matter of finding the voices you related to. For me, I find most of them supportive and encouraging, but those are the people I choose to follow. I don’t think that anyone should avoid the space all together because then they would miss out on all of the wonderful people who are committed to educating, supporting and learning along their personal journeys.

  5. Peter says:

    All of social media is pretty much the same. When you right a post or start a thread you need to follow it up with an explanation because someone didn’t understand or missed the point. It’s because of the lack of reading emotion and intention into someone’s post. The majority of people never get it on the first try and some are way to sensitive to bother with. The thread then becomes a long explanation of what was intended and the respondents usually add in their own opinion of some other unrelated points they try to make. This is especially true of FB pages. If someone is totally off grasping the meaning I would just ignore them. There’s no need to comment on their comments. I tend to ignore them, all!

  6. Sarah says:

    The personal finance blogging community is most certainly judgemental, but as humans, we all are judgemental (even if we don’t state our judgements of everything).

    Bloggers in a niche generally are the exception to a rule, and most bloggers aren’t writing for other bloggers. So while there may be strong opinions and a lot of judgement coming from other bloggers (because they have it together enough in the topic to write about it themselves), 95% of blog readers won’t comment, so we see a small sample size of mainly bloggers commenting on other blogger’s posts, instead of the real audience/readership.

    What I’m pretty much trying to say is that we only see the judgemental comments, so it seems as if all people who are interested in personal finance are judgemental, but it’s really just a very small portion of people who act this way but they just so happen to be in the upfront and center of it all.

  7. Kathy says:

    I do think personal finance bloggers can get pretty judgemental. There are certain topics that really seem to bring out the worst.
    1. Buying a new car instead of used.
    2. Buying things instead of traveling
    3. Spending too much on groceries (wink, wink)
    4. Eating out
    5. Spending money on cable TV

    There really seems to be a sense of them knowing the best way to live and aren’t shy about telling someone when they aren’t living in the approved way.

  8. Carla says:

    I think it was perhaps more of the comments that were left with people chiming in that their grocery budget was WAYYY too high. According to who? Who is to say what’s to high & what’s not? I wouldn’t worry about it… i’ve gotten a slew of comments about certains items i’ve purchased MANY times times… lol! Onwards & upwards! 😉

  9. Michelle says:

    I think the personal finance community can sometimes be judgmental. One topic I hardly ever talk about on my blog is cars because of the angry comments I sometimes get. So, I just try to entirely avoid the subject.

  10. Stephanie says:

    I haven’t run across a judgmental PF blogger, but their commenters… holy cow. I don’t get quite as many testy commenters on my blog. I guess money talk makes people feisty.
    I’m in the US (Chicago) and I spend $50 a month on groceries for 1. With once a week eating out and limited alcohol, I’d say the total budget is $100-$150. I mentioned that on another PF blog in the comments and definitely got pounced on!

  11. Money Beagle says:

    I think many people fall into the trap of ‘This has worked great for me so it has to work for you’ and fail to realize that there might be other ways for other people. This might come across as being overly judgmental. I don’t think you’re in this at all but I have seen others like this, and I tend to gravitate away from those sites.

  12. Alan W. says:

    Judgemental? Moi? Well, maybe a little 🙂

    I think pounding home the “Get out of debt!” message is important, however, I don’t think I’d fault anyone who felt that reusable feminine hygiene products were a little too frugal for them. How you want to live is really up to you, just don’t get into debt doing it.

  13. Interesting… I usually find that people are not critical enough, giving lots of props to people making awful decisions. Outside of the PF bubble, especially on sites like Yahoo Finance, though, the trolls come out in droves! As a blog owner, you have the power to delete comments 😉

  14. Boy I hope I’ve never come across as judgmental, if I have no one has pointed it out yet. Honestly, the thought never crossed my mind. I started blogging to find accountability and to help me learn and pay off debt. I also thought that if I could inspire someone else to get started with paying off debt and decluttering too then that’d be an added bonus. I did not think you came across judgmental at all. Keep up the hard work!

  15. Isabella says:

    I have found it to be just the opposite. I read a lot of finance blogs, and it feels like people hold back from criticism. Someone is deep in debt and living on a hobby farm with horses? Well, that’s just fine. The country is great for the kids. You want to take that vacation even though you have a boatload of student debt? Well, life is about balance, you know. I find that if you offer any honest, constructive and yes, non-judgmental criticism, people just jump all over you!

    I agree with Ann@Money Propeller. People often can’t take honest criticism, even in the kindest tone. And then they jump all over the commentator and everyone chimes in.

  16. It sounds like people were being a judge to you! You do open your life to criticism and that just comes with the territory. I didn’t read the article but I am sure you did not come off as judge or anything like that. Everyone is free to do as they please at the end of the day and what works for one, may not work for another.

  17. Part of the problem is, we PF bloggers read and comment on each other’s blogs all the time. We interact through social media, and even connect on other social media platforms. We become friends….friends speak to each other more freely, which can come across as a bit crass or judgmental to your average joe reader who doesn’t have the same connection, or realize that it exists.

  18. I’m new to the blogging scene and I’ve been trying to find the line here.

  19. I saw the post title in my feed before I could read the article and my answer was an immediate and resounding YES!
    After reading the article, I think my own answer needs some clarification. I don’t think the PF community necessarily posts negative comments on others’ blogs, and wouldn’t normally admonish you for your personal choices, but I do think that sometimes just the posts that are written by PF bloggers are very judgmental in nature. It almost seems like if you spend any money on anything that is non-essential, then you’re doing it wrong. The attention-grabbing headlines and the meant-for-shock-value posts cause serious eyerolls and I simply choose to ignore those bloggers.

  20. Lance @ HWI says:

    Sometimes I think people are pretty soft. I have found most people to be really too supportive, but I think if you are asking for comments, you should expect opinion. I remember working as a TV reporter when we all discussed the idea of adding comments to our news articles. Of course we were hoping for clicks, interaction and more revenue. We also said we were opening ourselves up to the best and most likely the worst of the internet. I am pretty used to it having had my articles attacked for years while working in news. I recently had a few articles featured on major websites and now my work has been exposed to 10’s of thousands of people instead of a few hundred. People are overly confident and critical in anonymity. That is the internet and social media…you have to have a thick skin. But now I am intrigued to write about cars and groceries 🙂

  21. debt debs says:

    I read your post on groceries and didn’t find it judgmental and was surprised that some commenters felt it was. I was amazed the people that could manage to keep their grocery low as this is something we struggle with. I took it as motivation to try harder, do more meal planning etc.

    On the other hand, depending on how one handles ones own finances and goals, it is unlikely that we will agree with all PF all of the time. I can think of 2 – 3 I’ve read recently and thought, I wouldn’t have done that, and I’m sure others would say the same for me. Sometimes you point out an alternative view (especially if it’s before a decision is made) and sometimes you just say nothing because you realize their goals or tolerances are different from yours, or in the spirit of community, it’s water under the bridge. But on the other hand, we shouldn’t put our $hit out there if we’re not ready to receive feedback, solicited or not. Posting a blog post means you’re soliciting feedback. I wrote a post on this recently based on my experiences posting comments to another blogger’s post.

  22. J says:

    I don’t find that you’re ever judgmental in your posts. PF is just that, personal, and therefore not everyone will agree on everything. It’s fun to read and see what others do and to learn from the community of bloggers that are out there.

  23. Michelle says:

    Of course we’re judgmental-we’re human! However, I think that how we express that judgement is the key. People aren’t always going to do what WE think is the right thing. There will be people who spend money on stuff that WE think is wrong. Etc. Until I start paying someone else’s mortgage I don’t feel it necessary to bash their choices-even if I think they are stupid choices. I make choices that other people will think are stupid.

    At the end of the day we have to do what’s right for us in our personal situation. If it’s the wrong decision we’ll learn pretty quickly. As for individuals who leave angry comments (I read the ones in that specific post) maybe they were spending too much and felt called out on it? But, until I start buying their groceries it’s really not my issue. Boom.

  24. There are 2 points I would like to make here.

    1. The blogging community is not judgmental at all.
    2. Remember that opinion you had that was different than mine? You are a stupid jerk for thinking that.

    Thanks.

  25. Jon says:

    I think that the majority of the community is here to help. I’ve had a lot of interaction with others and have nothing but good things to say about them. However, there are a few bad apples out there. I think they just try to pick a fight because that is who they are.

    A long time ago I got flack from another blogger for promoting a credit card. His claim was I was just writing a review because I was getting a cut. When I looked on his site, he was doing the same thing. At first I engaged him, but quickly realized there was no solution in his mind. He just kept attacking. So I ignored him and eventually he gave up.

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