Our DIY Bar and Kegerator

wpid-wp-1411303938689.jpegI’ll never forget the day we moved into our home. We arrived before the real estate agent on closing day to do the final walk through. As we were anxiously awaiting his arrival I was peeking my nose in the widow and noticed something protruding from the wall that I hadn’t seen before. I turned to my husband and pointed to the wall that, during the open house had a large desk against it, and inquired about what was sticking out from the wall in our basement.

While I was formulating a mental plan about how we were going to deal with the removal of these pipes sticking out from the wall my husband had a very different thought process going on. Before I could say anything he turned to me and said nothing but ”wet bar”. Though we weren’t yet in the house to inspect the pipes my husband was fairly confident they were water hookup pipes and we could easily hook them up to a wet bar he now had every intention of building.

Though I was annoyed, he was elated. Like a kid in Christmas morning finding extra candy at the bottom of the stocking. It didn’t take long for our required to-do list (like painting the walls) to take a bit of a back burner to make room for the creative juices to flow about this new project. And so the birth of our bar started.

I didn’t really care what he wanted to do, as long as we didn’t need to spend too much money on it. I also didn’t want something so permanent that future owners wouldn’t be able to easily remove it. With the help of his grandfather my husband created a pretty decent little DIY bar using leftover cabinetry and countertops from our kitchen renovation. Total cost, almost nothing. He did have to buy a few sheets of meranti wood, some extra moulding and few things he didn’t already have for the plumbing but that didn’t set us back any more than $50. After the bar was complete he found a seconds cabinet at a local hardware store for cheap, it was a few years ago now but I want to say he spent another $50 on the cabinet he uses to store all his collective glassware.

So for approximately $100 we were able to build a functioning wet bar complete with running water and storage. Two years after completion we added a mini fridge that we got on after-Christmas clearance for less than $100. Given how often we entertain (we make up excuses to host friends and family) it was a welcome addition but my husband still lusted for a functioning bar tap and kegerator. He had a vision and wasn’t going to stop until the liquid gold poured from his own bar tap.

We’re lucky that my husband’s cousin is an accomplished craft beer maker who is also involved in making home kegerators. He was able to give him a breakdown of everything he’d need to make a fully functional kegerator part-by-part. With the info in hand hubby started to save his pennies. He stashed his extra money and freelance income into his Tangerine account (use my Orange Key, 40755676S1, if interested in opening an account) until he had enough. Last weekend we tasted the beer from our keg for the first time and I think my husband’s purpose in life is now complete.

The DIY Kegerator cost more than the bar, totaling $500. This includes every single part needed from the fridge to the tap itself and every piece in between. Was it worth it? Well, it was my husband’s money to do what he wanted with but I will say yes anyway.

The Keg holds approximately 50 glasses of beer which cost about $20 to fill. I don’t know anywhere else you can get a glass of beer for $0.40. If we wanted to buy  2-4 beer we’re looking at $43 (don’t even get me started on how much alcohol costs here). Four times the amount of our new keg beer. It’s really good craft beer thanks to our hook-up! Hubby isn’t interested in making his own just yet so we’ll continue to fill the kegs when we want it.

Though this is very much a want and not a need we’re going to enjoy having it, especially when we get the other keg set up with my favorite raspberry wheat ale…I foresee more gym visits in my future to burn the beer off 🙂

For more ways to save money around the house check out these awesome articles.

Cost Cutting Ideas for When You’re Building a House
Some Things Are Worth Spending a Little Money On
Why I’m Glad We Have a ‘Starter’ Home

Enjoy Plunged in Debt?

Pid

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Comments

  1. Fun! Sounds like you ended up with an awesome solution! Way to go on building it so cheaply–that’s really quite ideal. Mr. FW has talked about home brewing and/or building a kegerator, but it hasn’t come to fruition yet…
    Mrs. Frugalwoods recently posted..The Zen of VacuumingMy Profile

  2. How you manage to put your DIY Bar and Kegerator is amazing. I myself would like to have one at home. Hoping to find a craft beer maker and a good kegerator to keep that keg chilled..
    Jayson @ Monster Piggy Bank recently posted..Why Using a Brokerage Firm is a Worthwhile InvestmentMy Profile

  3. That’s pretty cool! I have a wet bar area in my basement, but I never use it.
    Kayla @ Shoeaholicnomore recently posted..I Financed my ComputerMy Profile

  4. We had a wet bar in our home that is now our rental. We never really used it, but now that we don’t have one, I want it back! I think a bar is not only nice for your own use, but it adds a lot of value when people see it in the home. As far as a kegerator, sign me up! I would also love to brew my own beer.
    Kalen @ MoneyMiniBlog recently posted..Why You Should Always Read Your Insurance Policies CarefullyMy Profile

    • I like that ours can be removed relatively easy so if next buyers don’t want it they can remove it, though we like it, it;s not for everyone.

  5. That’s awesome. I put together a makeshift bar in the basment with an old dresser, strand of Christmas lights, mini-fridge, some decorations, and a throw rug (later removed after the cat pooped on it). No wet element on ours, but it’s somewhere to pour the drinks!
    Money Beagle recently posted..Domestic Violence, Spanking, And Oh Yeah, The NFLMy Profile

  6. That’s pretty cool. I don’t have a house yet, but when I get one I’m going to try to get a bar in the basement as well. Party time!
    Aldo @ Million Dollar Ninja recently posted..Frugal Dates: NYC High LineMy Profile

  7. The bar was pretty cheap and the other is his hobby. 🙂 We built a wet bar in our basement but never use it because we now rent our basement out.
    Like your new blog look, Catherine.
    debs @ debt debs recently posted..Frugal FinCon Fiesta – Ask me AnythingMy Profile

  8. This is something on my list as I have a basement to create and would love a wet bar with kegerator down there. I brew my own beer as well and that is the ultimate way to serve it up.
    Grayson @ Debt Roundup recently posted..Saving Money IS NOT Making Money!My Profile

  9. We’ve been talking about a kegerator (and kegging in general) for several years now. We homebrew and put it in bottles, but the kegs are great for things like sweet cider which can’t be carbonated “naturally”!
    Mom @ Three is Plenty recently posted..Closer to ClosingMy Profile

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Our DIY Bar and Kegerator

wpid-wp-1411303938689.jpegI’ll never forget the day we moved into our home. We arrived before the real estate agent on closing day to do the final walk through. As we were anxiously awaiting his arrival I was peeking my nose in the widow and noticed something protruding from the wall that I hadn’t seen before. I turned to my husband and pointed to the wall that, during the open house had a large desk against it, and inquired about what was sticking out from the wall in our basement.

While I was formulating a mental plan about how we were going to deal with the removal of these pipes sticking out from the wall my husband had a very different thought process going on. Before I could say anything he turned to me and said nothing but ”wet bar”. Though we weren’t yet in the house to inspect the pipes my husband was fairly confident they were water hookup pipes and we could easily hook them up to a wet bar he now had every intention of building.

Though I was annoyed, he was elated. Like a kid in Christmas morning finding extra candy at the bottom of the stocking. It didn’t take long for our required to-do list (like painting the walls) to take a bit of a back burner to make room for the creative juices to flow about this new project. And so the birth of our bar started.

I didn’t really care what he wanted to do, as long as we didn’t need to spend too much money on it. I also didn’t want something so permanent that future owners wouldn’t be able to easily remove it. With the help of his grandfather my husband created a pretty decent little DIY bar using leftover cabinetry and countertops from our kitchen renovation. Total cost, almost nothing. He did have to buy a few sheets of meranti wood, some extra moulding and few things he didn’t already have for the plumbing but that didn’t set us back any more than $50. After the bar was complete he found a seconds cabinet at a local hardware store for cheap, it was a few years ago now but I want to say he spent another $50 on the cabinet he uses to store all his collective glassware.

So for approximately $100 we were able to build a functioning wet bar complete with running water and storage. Two years after completion we added a mini fridge that we got on after-Christmas clearance for less than $100. Given how often we entertain (we make up excuses to host friends and family) it was a welcome addition but my husband still lusted for a functioning bar tap and kegerator. He had a vision and wasn’t going to stop until the liquid gold poured from his own bar tap.

We’re lucky that my husband’s cousin is an accomplished craft beer maker who is also involved in making home kegerators. He was able to give him a breakdown of everything he’d need to make a fully functional kegerator part-by-part. With the info in hand hubby started to save his pennies. He stashed his extra money and freelance income into his Tangerine account (use my Orange Key, 40755676S1, if interested in opening an account) until he had enough. Last weekend we tasted the beer from our keg for the first time and I think my husband’s purpose in life is now complete.

The DIY Kegerator cost more than the bar, totaling $500. This includes every single part needed from the fridge to the tap itself and every piece in between. Was it worth it? Well, it was my husband’s money to do what he wanted with but I will say yes anyway.

The Keg holds approximately 50 glasses of beer which cost about $20 to fill. I don’t know anywhere else you can get a glass of beer for $0.40. If we wanted to buy  2-4 beer we’re looking at $43 (don’t even get me started on how much alcohol costs here). Four times the amount of our new keg beer. It’s really good craft beer thanks to our hook-up! Hubby isn’t interested in making his own just yet so we’ll continue to fill the kegs when we want it.

Though this is very much a want and not a need we’re going to enjoy having it, especially when we get the other keg set up with my favorite raspberry wheat ale…I foresee more gym visits in my future to burn the beer off 🙂

For more ways to save money around the house check out these awesome articles.

Cost Cutting Ideas for When You’re Building a House
Some Things Are Worth Spending a Little Money On
Why I’m Glad We Have a ‘Starter’ Home

Enjoy Plunged in Debt?

Pid

Subscribe to get our latest content by email.

Powered by ConvertKit

  1. Fun! Sounds like you ended up with an awesome solution! Way to go on building it so cheaply–that’s really quite ideal. Mr. FW has talked about home brewing and/or building a kegerator, but it hasn’t come to fruition yet…

    1. Catherine says:

      It took us four years to get the ball rolling!

  2. How you manage to put your DIY Bar and Kegerator is amazing. I myself would like to have one at home. Hoping to find a craft beer maker and a good kegerator to keep that keg chilled..

  3. That’s pretty cool! I have a wet bar area in my basement, but I never use it.

    1. Catherine says:

      I probably wouldn’t if it was just me 🙂

  4. We had a wet bar in our home that is now our rental. We never really used it, but now that we don’t have one, I want it back! I think a bar is not only nice for your own use, but it adds a lot of value when people see it in the home. As far as a kegerator, sign me up! I would also love to brew my own beer.

    1. Catherine says:

      I like that ours can be removed relatively easy so if next buyers don’t want it they can remove it, though we like it, it;s not for everyone.

  5. Money Beagle says:

    That’s awesome. I put together a makeshift bar in the basment with an old dresser, strand of Christmas lights, mini-fridge, some decorations, and a throw rug (later removed after the cat pooped on it). No wet element on ours, but it’s somewhere to pour the drinks!

    1. Catherine says:

      Sounds charming 🙂

  6. That’s pretty cool. I don’t have a house yet, but when I get one I’m going to try to get a bar in the basement as well. Party time!

  7. The bar was pretty cheap and the other is his hobby. 🙂 We built a wet bar in our basement but never use it because we now rent our basement out.
    Like your new blog look, Catherine.

    1. oops, well it looked different there for a minute. Now it looks like it did before. ❓

      1. Catherine says:

        Yeah that’s weird…

  8. This is something on my list as I have a basement to create and would love a wet bar with kegerator down there. I brew my own beer as well and that is the ultimate way to serve it up.

    1. Catherine says:

      Absolutely!

  9. We’ve been talking about a kegerator (and kegging in general) for several years now. We homebrew and put it in bottles, but the kegs are great for things like sweet cider which can’t be carbonated “naturally”!

    1. Catherine says:

      Yeah cider would definitely need it I would think.

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